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Reservations
26Sep
CRIS WILLIAMSON, BARBARA HIGBIE, AND TERESA TRULL: THE REUNION TOUR: SANTA CRUZ
7:00 PM - 9:30 PM Kuumbwa Jazz Center
cris-williamson-16
Date: September 26, 2018 to September 26, 2018
Where: Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320 Cedar Street, Santa Cruz, California, United States, 95060
Phone: N/A
Event Type: Nightlife, Concerts & Music
Ticket Price: N/A
Back momentarily from New Zealand where she now makes her home, Teresa Trull joins forces with the Bay Area's Barbara Higbie and Seattleite Cris Williamson for an evening of beloved old and new favorites. This trio of friends composed of gutsy blues/rock vocal dynamo and songwriter, Teresa Trull, Grammy-nominated multi-instrumentalist and singer, Barbara Higbie, and the iconic singer/songwriter Cris Williamson brings a mixture of new material and old favorites to one of their favorite cities, Santa Cruz. Without a doubt, the very real friendship binding these three musicians brings a powerful mixture guaranteed to delight, inspire, cheer and comfort. Don't miss this one! About Cris: Decades before indie labels were the norm, and years before women had any real access to the industry, Cris Williamson was busy changing the face of popular music. In 1975, the twenty-something former schoolteacher recorded The Changer and the Changed, for her brainchild, Olivia Records, the first woman-owned woman-focused record company. Her music and voice quickly became an essential part of the soundtrack of a movement, and was the cornerstone of what would become known as women's music, music created, performed, and marketed specifically for and by women. Today, that recording, The Changer and the Changed, remains one of the best-selling independent releases of all time. For Cris, the music became the vehicle for something larger. Her lyrics appear on a regular basis in books and thesis papers. Her albums are part of the curriculum for women's studies courses, and thousands of people who may not even know her name join their voices in "Song of the Soul" around campfires and places of worship. She is embraced by women. She is sampled in hip-hop. Her music is used by midwives welcoming life into the world, while hospice choirs sing her songs in tender sacred escort. "She is often considered a treasure, passed hand-to-hand, person-to-person," says the
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